Osteopathy Explained

What is an Osteopath?

An Osteopath is a health practitioner who has a minimum of a 4 year masters degree (M.Ost) in Osteopathy. Osteopath is a protected title so can only be used by individuals who have a specific degree in that area. The degree itself is a broad ranging degree and involves modules in areas such as advanced anatomy, physiology of diseases, respiratory,cardiovascular and nervous systems, medical imaging and differential diagnosis. Their training includes over 1,000 hours of osteopathic technique training and a further 1,500 hours of clinical application with real patients in clinic before qualifying.

 

What does Osteopathy involve?

Osteopathy is a ‘hands-on’ form of complementary and alternative medicine, that focuses on the body’s relationship between organs, joints, ligaments, muscles and tendons.  Palpation is used in conjunction with specific medical tests to form a diagnosis and treatment plan tailored to each individual and their problem. A variety of safe and gentle techniques are used to increase joint movement, soft tissue and spinal flexibility and improve circulation, alongside providing lifestyle advice and specific exercises relevant to the individual and their condition.

Patients have the same confidentiality and rights when seeing an Osteopath as they do when seeing a doctor or dentist. Osteopaths are primary health care practitioners which means that you do not have to have a referral from a GP or specialist to have treatment. An Osteopath will carry out a full case history, assessment and diagnosis during the initial consultation. The primary concern is patient safety, and patients will be referred on if Osteopathy is not deemed an appropriate form of treatment for a particular condition.

 

What Techniques will be used?

A variety of safe and gentle techniques are used to increase joint movement, soft tissue and spinal flexibility and improve circulation, alongside providing lifestyle advice and specific exercises relevant to the individual and their condition. The techniques may include but are not limited to:

  • Spinal and peripheral joint manipulation
  • Cranial techniques
  • Soft tissue massage
  • Joint mobilisations
  • Medical acupuncture
  • soft tissue mobilisations

 

 

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